TIMELINE OF WOMEN IN SKI JUMPING


 
Austrian countess Paula Lamberg jumping in a skirt in 1911. 

Austrian countess Paula Lamberg jumping in a skirt in 1911. 

1924

Women have been ski jumping for over 100 years. When Chamonix, France, hosts the first Olympic Winter Games, ski jumping (for men only) is one of the eight sports. For the next 80 years, women jumped on their own or in informal sporting groups.

1994

International Ski Federation (FIS) establishes Women’s Ski Jumping Working Group. 

Austrian Eva Ganster

Austrian Eva Ganster

1994

Austria’s Eva Ganster is the first woman to forejump in the Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway. Women continued to forejump in subsequent Games thereafter.

1998

First FIS sanctioned ladies summer Grand Prix series. (17 athletes, 7 nations)

1999

First FIS sanctioned ladies winter Grand Prix series.

2004

In May, FIS Congress approves Ladies Continental Cup and Junior World Championships.

2004

In July, first FIS Ladies Continental Cup, Park City, Utah, United States.

2005

First FIS Ladies Junior World Championships, Kranj, Slovenia. (22 athletes, 9 nations)

Central Division ski jumpers calling for a women's ski jumping event in the 2010 Games. 

Central Division ski jumpers calling for a women's ski jumping event in the 2010 Games. 

2006

FIS Congress adds women’s ski jumping to the Nordic World Championships and by a 114-to-1 vote, recommends women be included in the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. Later that year, the IOC rejects adding a single women's ski jumping event to the Vancouver 2010 program.

2008

Active and retired women jumpers from 5 countries file a discrimination lawsuit in Vancouver to be included in the 2010 Games.

First ever World Championships for women's ski jumping held in 2009. 

First ever World Championships for women's ski jumping held in 2009. 

2009

First Nordic World Ski Championships to allow women to participate in ski jumping. Liberec, Czech Republic. American Lindsey Van wins gold, Germany's Ulrike Graessler wins silver, and Norway's Anette Sagen wins bronze.

2009

In July, British Columbia Supreme Court judge finds that the IOC is discriminating against women jumpers because of their gender, but stops short of ordering the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee to hold an event for them.

2010

The FIS votes to start a World Cup circuit (highest tier competitions) for women's ski jumping to begin
in the 2011/2012 season. The decision means better jumping venues, larger winnings purse, and
broadcast time for the events.

Austria's Daniela Iraschko wins 2011 World Championships. 

Austria's Daniela Iraschko wins 2011 World Championships. 

2011

Austria's Daniela Iraschko wins the 2011 World Championships in Oslo, Norway.

2011

April 6, the IOC Executive Board finally votes to include one women's ski jumping event (normal hill) in the Olympic Winter Games, beginning in Sochi, Russia in 2014.

 


Sarah Hendrickson becomes second American ever to win gold at World Championships. 

Sarah Hendrickson becomes second American ever to win gold at World Championships. 

2013

American Sarah Hendrickson wins 9 of 13 events to become the first ever women's World Cup ski jumping champion.

2013

Hendrickson wins the 2013 World Championships in Val di Fiemme, Italy. Japan's Sara Takanashi wins the overall World Cup title.

2014

Feb. 11 - Women compete in ski jumping for the first time in Olympic Winter Games history, 20 years after they began forejumping for the men.